A brief history of innovation in higher education

Today it was my pleasure to speak at the annual UW-Madison Teaching and Learning Symposium as one of three keynote speakers on the theme of “Transforming Education.”  (I want to thank everyone who stayed to hear my talk, especially since it was at the end of the whole event and lunch was calling!)

As with the earlier talks by Professor Davidson and Professor Ladson-Billings, my presentation, “A brief history of innovation in higher education,” drew on my own research to explore this topic:

The rhetoric of innovation implies something new and revolutionary, but higher education has a long tradition of experimenting with new technologies, new audiences, and new strategies for teaching and learning. In this talk, Professor Downey will draw on his research into technology and society to set the current debates over higher education innovation in historical context.

I won’t repeat the talk in this post — you can check out reaction on Flickr and Twitter (#teachuw) if you like — but let me just post the slides and highlight the conclusion:

  • Technological innovations in education are always complex, often contradictory, and inevitably tied up with questions about work, value, identity, and power.
  • Considering our own syllabi in historical context can help us productively engage with such questions.
  • All of our scholarship — whether on today’s digital-savvy youth, tomorrow’s advances in brain science, or yesterday’s information infrastructures — can and should be rich sources of teaching and learning innovation.

Finally, here are some links to the original research on which the three case studies in the talk were based:

Thanks again to the organizers of this event for inviting me, and to the audience for their thoughtful commentary!